Mostly cloudy

35°F

Shelton, WA

Mostly cloudy
Humidity: 100%
  • Inclement Weather Makes A Long Night For PUD3 Linemen

    PUD3 2014JAfter a full day of rainfall which totaled over an inch-and-a-half, and included wind gusts over 30MPH, some areas of Mason County were left in the dark.  Rainwater soaked delicate electrical equipment, and sent flooded-out critters scrambling up power lines to escape the wet. Linemen for Mason PUD3 were themselves… Read More +

  • 1
  • 2 Troopers Injured On I-5

    WSPcarpartialshotThe Washington State Patrol says two troopers who were injured Sunday night on Interstate 5 in north Seattle have been released from a hospital. The two were injured in separate crashes related to a racing incident. Trooper Chris Webb says one trooper was attempting to stop two racing cars about 9… Read More +

  • 1
  • Seahawks Close In On NFC West Title

    lynchdec2114Russell Wilson threw for two touchdowns and ran for another, Seattle set a franchise record with 596 yards of offense, and the streaking Seahawks closed in on another NFC West title with a 35-6 romp over the Arizona Cardinals on Sunday night. Seattle moved into a tie with Arizona for first in the NFC West and the Seahawks hold the tiebreaker by virtue of two wins over the Cardinals.

    Read More
  • 1

Cell Carriers Reject Kill Switches on Smartphones to Battle Thefts

b_250_0_16777215_00_images_obgrabber_2013-11_5b78ff4b9b.jpgJustin Sullivan/Getty Images (SAN FRANCISCO) -- About 1.6 million smartphones were stolen in 2012, Consumer Reports estimates. George Gascón, the district attorney of San Francisco, wants to decrease that number by working with manufacturers to install kill switches that would render smartphones inoperable if reported as stolen. Gascón biggest opponents aren't the phone manufacturers, but the cellular providers.

Gascón said he reached out to Samsung this summer to implement the kill switches. "They engaged a third-party developer willing to develop it, and said they would roll it out with the Galaxy 5 phones," he told ABC News. "But the carriers said to Samsung, 'Absolutely not.' We were perplexed, so we started to look into it."

Gascón said he is suspicious of the wireless carriers' motives for rejecting the kill switch. "There were email conversations between Samsung and the kill-switch developer, saying that the carriers were concerned about losing business," he said. "I became outraged."

Samsung declined to comment on specific details involving Gascón, but issued the following statement: "We are working with the leaders of the Secure Our Smartphones (S.O.S.) Initiative to incorporate the perspective of law enforcement agencies. We will continue to work with them and our wireless carrier partners towards our common goal of stopping smartphone theft."

It might not be immediately apparent how a kill switch would decrease the number of smartphones stolen. Gascón said it might take some time to trickle down, but that once smartphone thieves see that they can't do anything with a stolen smartphone, their motivation to steal more phones will disappear.

He estimates that any effects could be two to three years down the road, depending on how often people replace their devices or update their operating system.

Both Verizon and AT&T declined to speak about the issue and deferred to CTIA-The Wireless Association for further comment. Jamie Hastings, vice president of external and state affairs for CTIA, did not directly address the decision regarding kill switches, but said all carriers are working on a multi-pronged approach to lower the number of phone thefts in the country.

"One of the components of the efforts was to create an integrated database designed to prevent stolen phones from being reactivated," Hastings said in a statement. "To assist users, we offer a list of apps to download that will remotely erase, track and/or lock the stolen devices."

Kevin Mahaffey, the chief technology officer of Lookout Mobile Security, said it's also important not to rush into any manufacturing decision that could have a big impact. "There are different risks associated with different technologies in order to solve a problem," he said. "There's no silver bullet or pixie dust to make it work."

While a kill switch might deter thieves, it could increase the risk of a cyberattack that could affect millions of phones at a time. "You have to appreciate the carrier perspective as well," Mahaffey said. "If your phone stops working, who do you expect to replace it?"

Like many issues, it all comes down to better understanding and communication between law enforcement, cell carriers and phone manufacturers.

"No one party has the whole picture," he said. "Each has their own insight, and we need to get all of these parties to work together."

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

  1. Environment
  2. Recreation

Tweets

WAHealthEquity
WAHealthEquity - RT: @WASBOH Every child deserves to grow up healthy! 1.usa.gov/1ncZ7CU #healthiestnextgen #waedu @GovInslee @WA_DeptofHealth

Retweeted 2 hours ago

westgov
westgov - Via @TexGov: SpaceX is set to create 300 new US jobs in #Texas in huge expansion. Check it out! ow.ly/G7as4 @TexasOne

2 hours ago

GeoffBakerTIMES
GeoffBakerTIMES - COLUMN: Despite cheaper costs, there's nothing easy about running a pro indoor soccer team. A look inside the books. seattletimes.com/html/sports/20…

Retweeted 2 hours ago

westgov
westgov - Great article by @amyjoi16 on why tackling #Utah's challenge of tracking water rights is so complicated ow.ly/G8ayA

2 hours ago

Public Notices