Selling and Giving Shares

Sell Loser Shares And Give Away The Resulting Cash; Give Away Winner Shares.  Say you want to make some gifts to favorite relatives and/or favorite charities. You can make gifts in conjunction with an overall revamping of your holdings of stocks and equity mutual fund shares held in taxable brokerage firm accounts. Here is how to get the best tax results from your generosity.

Gifts to Relatives. Do not give away loser shares (currently worth less than you paid for them). Instead, sell the shares and take advantage of the resulting capital losses, and then, give the cash sales proceeds to the relative. Do give away winner shares to relatives. Most likely, they will pay lower tax rates than you would pay if you sold the shares. In fact, relatives who are in the 10% or 15% federal income tax brackets will generally pay a 0% federal tax rate on long-term gains from shares, if held for over a year before being sold. For purposes of meeting the more-than-one-year rule for gifted shares, count your ownership period plus the recipient relative’s ownership period, however brief. Even if the shares are held for one year or less before being sold, your relative will probably end up paying a lower tax rate than you would. However, beware of one thing before employing this give-away-winner-shares strategy. Gains recognized by a relative who is under age 24 may be taxed at his or her parent’s higher rates under the so-called Kiddie Tax rules (contact us if you are concerned about this issue).

Gifts to Charities. The strategies for gifts to relatives work equally well for gifts to IRS-approved charities. Sell loser shares and claim the resulting tax-saving capital loss on your return. Then give the cash sales proceeds to the charity and claim the resulting charitable write-off (assuming you itemize deductions). This strategy results in a double tax benefit (tax-saving capital loss plus tax-saving charitable contribution deduction). With winner shares, give them away to charity instead of giving cash, because for publicly traded shares that you’ve owned over a year, your charitable deduction equals the full current market value at the time of the gift. Plus, when you give winner shares away, you walk away from the related capital gains tax. So, this idea is another double tax-saver (you avoid capital gains tax on the winner shares, and you get a tax-saving charitable contribution). Because the charitable organization is tax-exempt, it can sell your donated shares without paying taxes to the IRS.

Latest Tax & Accounting News By Mike Wittenberg
Posted July 25, 2013