Low-Income Teens More Susceptible to Obesity

b_250_0_16777215_00_images_obgrabber_2014-01_315a1a420b.jpgmoodboard/Thinkstock (CAMBRIDGE, Mass.) -- Teen obesity is still a major problem in the U.S. although the skyrocketing rate from a decade ago has mostly flattened in recent years. In fact, the news is pretty good for teens from families whose parents went to college. Studies show the rate at somewhere between 7 and 11 percent during the years 2003 through 2010-11.

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Animals Burn More Calories but Humans Live Longer

b_250_0_16777215_00_images_obgrabber_2014-01_14517bce30.jpgKeith Barlow/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- Non-primate animals have got it made, at least in one important sense. A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals that humans and their primate cousins burn 50 percent fewer calories daily than other animals, explaining why you might never see a fat crow.  However, the same can't be said for elephants.

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Why Do Parents Mix Up Their Kids' Names?

b_250_0_16777215_00_images_obgrabber_2014-01_9a00e4fc11.jpgJupiterimages/Thinkstock (AUSTIN, Texas) -- Often in haste, parents will call their kids by the wrong name. While children might feel a little put out by the mistake, neither they nor their folks should read too much into it, according to Zenzi Griffin, professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, who chalks it up to a blip in the brain's information-retrieval process.

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Dating Site Heated Up During Deep Freeze

b_250_0_16777215_00_images_obgrabber_2014-01_16629c5424.jpgArtemSam/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- Something good might have come out of that massive blast of arctic air known as the polar vortex that froze much of the country in early January. The online dating site Zoosk reported a surge of memberships and messages during the worst of the cold weather, particularly in metro areas that were hardest hit.

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Green Tea and Blood Pressure Drug Don't Mix

b_250_0_16777215_00_images_obgrabber_2014-01_34f23f8246.jpgbit245/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- Health experts have touted the medicinal benefits of green tea for years but there’s a new report that might make some people reluctant to start enjoying the beverage. A team of international researchers from Japan, Germany and Italy say that green tea has been shown to interact with the prescription drug nadolol, which is taken to control high blood pressure.

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