Majority of New Relationships Born on Twitter, Survey Says

b_250_0_16777215_00_images_obgrabber_2013-09_ba4779eab3.jpgOli Scarff/Getty Images (NEW YORK) -- What’s your best 140-character pick-up line? According to a recent study conducted by the British online retailer PIXmania, Twitter is now the preferred form of communication between prospective romantic partners. Twitter tops text messages and phone calls.

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Could Weight-Loss Surgery Hold a Cure for Diabetes?

b_250_0_16777215_00_images_obgrabber_2013-09_375f365040.jpgIngram Publishing/Thinkstock (CLEVELAND) -- Obese patients with type 2 diabetes have been shown in past research to benefit quickly from bariatric surgery such as gastric bypass. But what about the long-term benefits?  A new study shows the weight-loss surgery may help these patients end their battle with diabetes.

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Jennifer Aniston Reveals Shockingly Simple Beauty Secrets

b_250_0_16777215_00_images_obgrabber_2013-09_d33ac4b7ad.jpgJamie McCarthy/Getty Images for Living Proof (NEW YORK) -- Jennifer Aniston is a red carpet icon and America’s favorite girl next door, and now she’s spilling her beauty secrets including the tricks that make her hair the envy of so many women. In a new interview for the October issue of Redbook magazine, the star tells all about her shockingly simple beauty routine.

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A B Vitamin a Day Keeps the Stroke Away?

b_250_0_16777215_00_images_obgrabber_2013-09_2b58ed8240.jpgJupiterimages/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- For many years, doctors have been looking at the role of Vitamin B in reducing stroke risks. Now, new research suggests the supplements could, in fact, help. The theory is that B vitamins, especially B12, lower blood levels of homocysteine, an amino acid tied to blood vessel problems.

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‘Cat Lady’ Parasite Linked to Permanent Brain Damage

b_250_0_16777215_00_images_obgrabber_2013-09_e16cdf0921.jpgiStock/Thinkstock (NEW YORK) -- A parasite commonly found in cat litter has been found to permanently alter the brains of mice, making them perpetually fearless of their natural predators, cats. A new study published Thursday in PLOS ONE Journal examined the behavior of mice after being infected with the toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) parasite.  The study found mice were significantly less afraid of the scent of a predator even when there was no sign of infection.

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